Drink coffee for longer life, scientists say

They found that people who drank a cup of coffee each day were 12 percent less likely die, according to a USC statement.

Jason Spencer | Jul 13, 2017

A broad new study suggests that people who drink coffee daily live longer.

Scientists from the University of Southern California's Keck School of Medicine looked at more than 215,000 participants in the Multiethnic Cohort Study a joint effort between the Keck School of Medicine and the University of Hawaii Cancer Center.

They found that people who drank a cup of coffee each day were 12 percent less likely die, according to a USC statement.

That percentage rose to 18 percent for those who drank two to three cups per day. And lower risk of death was found whether people drank regular or decaffeinated coffee, said lead author of an article to be published in the July 11 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine, Veronica W. Setiawan, suggesting caffeine is not responsible for the lower mortality.

Coffee drinkers had a lower risk of mortality from cancer, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, respiratory disease, and kidney disease. These results applied across ethnicity, to whites, African Americans, Latinos, and Japanese Americans.

"We cannot say drinking coffee will prolong your life, but we see an association," said Setiawan, in the statement. "If you like to drink coffee, drink up! If you're not a coffee drinker, then you need to consider if you should start."

According to Setiawan, coffee contains antioxidants and phenolic compounds that help prevent cancer.

"Although this study does not show causation or point to what chemicals in coffee may have this 'elixir effect,' it is clear that coffee can be incorporated into a healthy diet and lifestyle," Setiawan added.

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