Scientists move one step closer to universal cancer tests
Scientists move one step closer to universal cancer tests
A new process known as Cancer Seek can test for up to eight cancers at once.
Saturn moon Titan has Earth-like global sea level
Saturn moon Titan has Earth-like global sea level
Complete map of Moon's surface created using Cassini data and computer algorithms.
Blood test detects 8 common cancers, study reports
Blood test detects 8 common cancers, study reports
The test could be incorporated into routine medical checkups and eventually could cost less than $500, according to the study.
Worlds in multi-planet systems have similar sizes, spacings
Worlds in multi-planet systems have similar sizes, spacings
Contrast with diversity of our solar system could mean they have different histories and evolutionary processes.
Mantis shrimp could inspire ultra-strong materials
Joseph Scalise - Jan 21, 2018
Scientists are looking at the mantis shrimp for inspiration for new durable materials.
 
Carnivorous plant inspires anti-biofouling technology
Joseph Scalise - Jan 21, 2018
Researchers have created new nanomaterials they hope will be able to prevent biofouling.
 
Divers in Mexico find world's longest underwater cave
Delila James - Jan 21, 2018
The newly discovered underwater cave system contains many Mayan relics, which will shed additional light on the ancient Mayan culture and how it evolved.
 
None of five teams likely to meet Google Lunar X Prize deadline
Laurel Kornfeld - Jan 21, 2018
Difficulties and delays are largely due to funding problems.
 
Holding back a sneeze can lead to a ruptured throat, study reports
Joseph Scalise - Jan 21, 2018
A 34-year-old man in England shows that stifling a sneeze can harm your throat.
 
Anxiety could be a precursor to Alzheimer's, study reports
Joseph Scalise - Jan 21, 2018
Researchers have found a strong link between increasing anxiety levels and Alzheimer's disease.
 
Zap space junk with lasers, scientists say
Delila James - Jan 21, 2018
Even small pieces of debris can pose a danger to the International Space Station and active satellites.
 
High-salt diet could negatively affect the brain
Joseph Scalise - Jan 21, 2018
Recent research shows that high-salt diets negatively impact cognitive function by restricting blood flow to the brain.
 
4,000-year-old Egyptian mummies were half-brothers, DNA analysis reveals
Delila James - Jan 18, 2018
The 4,000-year-old, 12th Dynasty mummies belong to two aristocratic males, named Khnum-nakht and Nakht-ankh, and date to about 1800 BC.
 
Social marmots die faster than isolated ones
Joseph Scalise - Jan 18, 2018
A new study shows that isolated marmots tend to live longer than their social counterparts.
 
Chameleon bones glow under UV light
Joseph Scalise - Jan 18, 2018
A new study shows that chameleons have glowing fluorescent bones.
 
Writing to-do lists can lead to a better night's sleep, study reports
Joseph Scalise - Jan 18, 2018
A new study shows that people sleep better if they write to-do lists before bed.
 
Scientists uncover second way bacteria make methane
Joseph Scalise - Jan 18, 2018
New research shows that bacteria have a previously unknown way to make methane, a discovery that could have both ecological and medical implications.
 
Black Death spread by fleas and lice, not rats
Delila James - Jan 18, 2018
Bubonic plague is caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis and is often spread through the bite of infected fleas.
 
Hubble finds Milky Way's central bulge to be an active stellar region
Laurel Kornfeld - Jan 18, 2018
Bulge stars' motions seem to vary based on their chemical compositions.
 
BRCA gene does not affect survival rate of breast cancer patients, study reports
Joseph Scalise - Jan 18, 2018
A new study shows that BRCA mutations do not affect breast cancer survival rates within the first 10 years of treatment.
 
Ancient galaxy found through gravitational lensing
Laurel Kornfeld - Jan 16, 2018
13.3-billion-year-old galaxy is the most distant to ever be seen through microlensing technique.
 
Salmonella may have led to massive Mexican epidemic, study reports
Joseph Scalise - Jan 16, 2018
For the first time in history, scientists have shed light on the pathogen that killed millions of people throughout Mexico in the mid-1500's.